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Healthcare professionals' pharmacovigilance knowledge and adverse drug reaction reporting behavior and factors determining the reporting rates

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dc.contributor.author Güner, Müberra Devrim
dc.contributor.author Ekmekci, Perihan Elif
dc.date.accessioned 2019-12-30T07:23:10Z
dc.date.available 2019-12-30T07:23:10Z
dc.date.issued 2019
dc.identifier.citation Güner, M. D., & Ekmekci, P. E. (2019). Healthcare professionals’ pharmacovigilance knowledge and adverse drug reaction reporting behavior and factors determining the reporting rates. Journal of drug assessment, 8(1), 13-20. en_US
dc.identifier.issn 1369-9474
dc.identifier.uri https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/21556660.2019.1566137
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11851/3212
dc.description.abstract Background: Spontaneous adverse drug reaction (ADR) reports prepared by healthcare professionals (HCPs) are the backbone of collecting post-marketing safety data. However, underreporting is a global problem creating health, economic, and ethical burden. Objectives: To determine the factors limiting ADR reporting rates from the HCPs' point of view. Methods: A questionnaire containing 43 questions evaluating sociodemographic characteristics, pharmacovigilance knowledge and activities, and prescription behaviors was prepared on "surveymonkey.com." The link was distributed mainly by professional organizations. Results: Although this survey aimed to reach all HCPs, most of the respondents were physicians and nurses. Of the 259 (69.6%) participants who encountered ADR at least once, only 105 (40.5%) reported ADR. The term "pharmacovigilance" was heard for the first time in this survey by 35.5% (n = 132) of the participants. Only 34.7% (n = 129) of the participants knew where to find the ADR reporting form, and 25.5% (n = 95) had previously filled the form and/or read it. Only 28.5% (n = 106) of the participants were aware of the ADR reporting and monitoring system of their institutions and related professionals. Almost all the participants agreed that pharmacovigilance and ADR reporting training are necessary. Conclusion: The main reason for underreporting is limited pharmacovigilance knowledge of HCPs. Training activities based on the needs and preferences of HCPs and close follow-up by authorities are the main steps to improve pharmacovigilance activities. en_US
dc.language.iso eng en_US
dc.publisher TAYLOR & FRANCIS INC en_US
dc.rights info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.subject Adverse drug reaction reporting en_US
dc.subject pharmacovigilance knowledge en_US
dc.subject healthcare professional en_US
dc.subject drug safety en_US
dc.title Healthcare professionals' pharmacovigilance knowledge and adverse drug reaction reporting behavior and factors determining the reporting rates en_US
dc.type article en_US
dc.relation.journal JOURNAL OF DRUG ASSESSMENT en_US
dc.contributor.department TOBB ETÜ, Tıp Fakültesi, Dahili Tıp Bilimleri Bölümü tr_TR
dc.contributor.department TOBB ETU, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Internal Medical Sciences en_US
dc.identifier.volume 8
dc.identifier.issue 1
dc.identifier.startpage 13
dc.identifier.endpage 20
dc.contributor.orcid https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6982-9026
dc.identifier.wos WOS:000469909300001
dc.contributor.tobbetuauthor Güner, Müberra Devrim
dc.contributor.tobbetuauthor Ekmekci, Perihan Elif
dc.contributor.YOKid 102302
dc.contributor.YOKid 234463
dc.identifier.PubMedID PMID:30729064
dc.identifier.doi 10.1080/21556660.2019.1566137
dc.relation.publicationcategory Makale - Uluslararası Hakemli Dergi - Kurum Öğretim Elemanı tr_TR


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